Home » Govt-State » Nevada’s Domestic Violence Survivors Are Counting on You

Nevada’s Domestic Violence Survivors Are Counting on You

Judy Waxman

— by Judy Waxman

Vice President for Health & Reproductive Rights
National Women’s Law Center

 

For some women, the greatest threat to their lives could be the man she lives with. For women in Nevada, ranked first in the nation in domestic violence homicides, something as simple as getting out of their apartment rental agreement could mean the difference between life or death.

Nevada’s state lawmakers are considering a bill that would help survivors of domestic violence by giving them the ability to end their rental agreement after a domestic violence incident. But the pressure from lobbyists will make this a close vote. We need your help today — tell your state Senator to stand with domestic violence survivors and support AB 284.
In Nevada, a woman is more than twice as likely to be killed by a partner as the average American woman. Domestic violence survivors face many challenges but moving to safety or leaving their abuser shouldn’t be one of them.

This week, your state Senator will vote on a bill that can make it easier for women to leave her unsafe home. Tell them to stand up for survivors of domestic violence and support AB 284.


I just took action by telling my state Senator to stand with domestic violence survivors in Nevada and support AB 284, and I hope you will, too.

Nevada’s state lawmakers are considering a bill that would help survivors of domestic violence by giving them the ability to end their rental agreement after a domestic violence incident. But the pressure from lobbyists will make this a close vote.  Here’s a copy of my customized letter:

This bill will help survivors of domestic violence by giving them the ability to end their rental agreement after a domestic violence incident. Domestic violence survivors face many challenges; moving to safety or leaving their abuser shouldn’t be one of them.

As a survivor of domestic violence, I cannot begin to impress upon you just  how important that is. I was in the Navy at the time.  My commanding officer was so concerned that my violent spouse, from whom I’d filed for divorce, would shoot up the communications center in an effort to get to me, that he helped me get a transfer to someplace where I was more likely to be safe from him … Iceland.  I also had a landlord at the time who was understanding of my situation and who waved the remaining lease requirements.  I was lucky, and I’m alive and well today because of those who helped me.  Many women aren’t.

Domestic violence isn’t something to be ignored. As of 2011, Nevada ranked first in the nation in domestic violence homicides. Requiring that law enforcement get involved in a domestic violence situation will not always ensure the safety of the woman. Many times, the survivor first needs to seek safety away from the abuser. Please ensure that the written statement from the third party qualified list remains included as a means to allow women to leave an unsafe situation. This list is primarily made up of licensed professionals such as a clergy member and will address the realities of domestic violence, specifically the high rate of domestic violence that occurs where law enforcement is not involved.

I urge you to stand with domestic violence survivors by voting YES on AB 284.

Please take the time to tell your state Senator to support AB 284 and make it easier for survivors of domestic violence to leave their abusers

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